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Twittering Vicar makes the news

A photo of the notice giving church wifi

I was interested to see the news cycle today includes the story of Rev Andrew Alden who is, apparently, Britain’s first ‘Twitter Vicar’ – according to Sky.

I find this story interesting on two levels.

The press’ fascination with quirky Vicars

It seems that, every now and again, you can pretty much guarantee that the press will fall over themselves when clergy adopt new technology. Read more

Hands-free worship

Book jacket image for Hands-free worship by David Green
Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

I am very pleased to announce that I have self-published my first book ‘Hands-free worship’.

What is it about? Well, the snappy sub-title gives you a clue: the ‘pastoral, theological and missiological dimensions of digital projection and computer technology in worship’.

In essence, I started researching and writing because, while I was aware of various books out there that look at the practical dimensions of what happens when churches use projection technology to worship, I felt that no-one was writing about what happens pastorally and theologically when projection is utilized. Furthermore, I felt it was influencing mission and I wanted to think about and address those issues.

I am a fan of projection, but I’ve also seen it used badly and in the book I try to Read more

Oh Rowan, say it ain’t so

Archbishop Rowan Williams

Last Friday morning, as increasingly I tend to do, I opened the news apps on my iPad rather than buying a daily paper and groaned.

The top ‘trending’ topic was that Archbishop Rowan Williams had announced his intention to step down at the end of this year. There had been rumbles for a while within church circles but I guess I was ignoring the rumours in the hope that the rumbles were wrong.

Already, various reviews and ‘obituaries’ of his ten years as Archbishop are starting to emerge both in print and online and, inevitably, they all make enormous play of Read more

The butterfly effect

A kind friend decides to give me a Christmas present: a fifteen pound voucher for iTunes.
I purchase Ed Sheeran‘s +
I visit Israel in January, my first real chance to listen to the whole album in one go.
I listen to it again and again.
In fact I spend the entire trip listening to it.
The song that stays with me most of all is ‘small bump’.
My wife goes away for a few days and I wake up each morning surrounded by my kids.
After day one, the alarm on my phone becomes ‘small bump’.
I remember the child we lost in the summer of 2007.
My kids start to hear some of the lyrics and understand some of it.
‘You can wrap your fingers round my thumb’ (as my youngest son does just that)
I remember families in this parish whose pain is as real now as ours was then.
My kids jump on me again and I am thankful for their laughter.
I reflect on the fragility of human life
and that the eternal Word would take the risk and become a helpless infant.
I remember a snippet from Ecclesiastes ‘they have never seen the sun or known anything, yet they find rest’.

“You were just a small bump unborn for four months then torn from life.
Maybe you were needed up there but we’re still unaware as why.”

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Npp7ZFOgpyM[/youtube]

Like this really helps the debate

Screengrab from Guardian website, 05 March 2012

Tonight I had to really think. As a priest, is it okay to swear on my own blog? Do I have a rule against swearing? Have I ever sworn before on this blog?

I have no idea, to be honest, to any of those questions but I find myself sorely tempted to start swearing this evening after reading a big pile of garbage being served up like cold school dinner over on the Guardian website today.

Apparently, they say, church schools shun the poorest pupils. No doubt, there will be more weeping and gnashing of teeth by secularists (or perhaps just triumphal cries) while the middle classes tut knowingly. But before you absorb too much of this headline, let’s drill down a bit into the article.

First off, there is the fact that the journalists seem not to know the difference between a ‘faith school’ (set-up to educate kids and propagate that particular faith) and a ‘church school’. Clearly, these journalists hadn’t read (or had forgotten) Read more